About the research group Culture, Criticism, Community


This is the research blog of the research group Culture – Criticism – Community (CCC). The group is an interdisciplinary and international research group that gathers researchers with a critical research interest.The purpose of our research is to raise critical discussion and challenge existing assumptions, ideas and practices within the field, thus ultimately contributing to change. 

Through various empirical and theoretical approaches, our research projects aim to explore arts education, cultural expressions, cultural participation, community arts and arts communities.Keywords: Culture, criticism, community, context, diversity, participation, equality, justice, and democracy.

Members:  Silje Valde Onsrud (leader), Kari Holdhus, Ingvild Digranes, Sigrid Jordal Havre, Tine Grieg Viig, Øystein Kvinge, Felicity Burbridge Rinde, Synnøve Kvile, Katrine Heggstad, Catharina Christophersen, Jonas Cisar Romme, Marit Loe Bjørnstad, Arnhild Liene Stenersen, Kirsti Aksnes, Aslaug Nyrnes, Lykke Guanio-Uluru, Ailbhe Kenny (Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick), and Judy Lewis (Thornton School of Music, University of South California).

A new doctor in Culture – Criticism – Community

Øystein Kvinge had his doctoral defence the 18th October 2019 at the University of Bergen, Faculty of Psychology. The thesis is called Presentation in Teacher Educaton: A study of student teachers’ transformation and representation of subject content using semiotic technology, and consists of three articles and a synopsis. The articles are titled:

  1. Performing the Pre-Formed: Towards a Conceptual Framework for Understanding Teaching as Curricular Transformation, published in Designs for Learning (2018), 10 (1) pp. 29-39
  2. “Playin” the changes’ – A jazz approach to researching student-teachers’ PowerPoint presentations, published in Cogent Education (2018), 5
  3. Teaching represented: a study of student-teachers’ representation of the professional practice of teaching, published in the book Norsk og internasjonal lærerutdanningsforskning: hvor er vi? Hvor vil vi gå? Hva skal vi gjøre nå? (2018) Bergen: Fagbokforlaget

We congratulate our research group member with an impressing defence of high quality. We are looking forward to new research projects together in the time to come.

The FUTURED-project has now officially started

Photo: Tine Grieg Viig and Mathe Seljestad Berg-Olsen

The research project «Music Education for the Future» (FUTURED 2019-2022) started up with a kick off seminar 9th-10th September in Bergen, Norway with researchers from Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and Oslo Metropolitan University in addition to guest researchers from Norway, Finland, Ireland and The United States.

The researchers presented the three work packages, and had response and critical comments from guests, steering group and advisory board members. This was helpful for moving on with the continuing work in all the different parts of the study. Data will be collected through a national survey and qualitative interviews with preservice teachers in Norwegian music teacher education, as well as through participatory action research with preservice teachers both on campus and in practicum in collaboration with a musician and a music teacher.

The purpose of the study is to map the current situation in Norwegian music teacher education and together with students develop tools to empower educators and preservice teachers to handle future challenges that music education has a potential to meet. Read more about the project here.

Catharina Christophersen is managing the project. Researchers from Culture, Criticism, Community involved in the project are Silje Valde Onsrud, Kari Holdhus, Tine Grieg Viig (postdoc), Eyolf Nysæther (Ph.D. candidate), Judy Lewis (guest researcher) and Ailbhe Kenny (guest researcher). Other researchers involved are Jan Sverre Knudsen (OsloMet), Bendik Fredriksen (OsloMet), Hanne Fossum (OsloMet), Jon Helge Sætre (NMH), and Heidi Partti (University of the Arts Helsinki).

From the discussions of the work packages. Photo: Catharina Christophersen.

Music in primary schools and social inclusion of immigrant pupils in Norway

Felicity Burbridge Rinde

This PhD project is a critical investigation of participatory music making as an arena for inclusion and community building in primary schools with intensive language classes for newly arrived immigrant pupils, exploring dynamics of inclusion and exclusion.

Norway has recently experienced a relatively large influx of immigrants that has led to rapid changes in its formerly fairly homogeneous society and school system. The national curriculum states that music as a school subject plays a central role in adapted teaching in an inclusive school, and that in a multicultural society music education has the potential to contribute to pupils’ positive identity formation through encouraging a sense of belonging to their own cultures and cultural heritage, as well as tolerance and respect for other people’s cultures.

To collect data, an ethnographic case study of music lessons and music activities in an urban primary school with an intensive language class is carried out, including:

  • Non-participant observation
  • Interviews with pupils, teachers and head
  • Field notes and researcher reflexive log
  • Pilot project participatory music workshops

The theoretical starting points of the study are:

  • Intercultural education (Portera, 2010)
  • Socialisation into educational settings that allows ‘newcomers’ to be active subjects in their new surroundings (Biesta, 2015)
  • Potential communities of musical practice (Kenny, 2016) in schools with intensive language classes
  • Building community through musical participation (Turino, 2008)
  • Musical action as a performative, social phenomenon (Bowman, 2007)
  • Inclusion and exclusion processes for minority language students in Norwegian schools (Hilt, 2016; Jortveit, 2014)

Project period: 2017 – 2021

Moments from the open seminar arranged by Culture, Criticism, Community 20th February 2019

The open seminar Student – teacher-artist collaborations: Developing multi-professional creative partnerships in schools was arranged by the CCC research group 20th February 2019 at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, campus Bergen. Here are some moments from the seminar. You find the whole program under Events in this blog.

Ailbhe Kenny is sharing her experiences from a teacher-artist collaboration project in Ireland.
Jonas Cisar Romme and Kari Holdhus are sharing experiences from the Disko project at Stord, Norway.
Panel discussion with the audience moderated by Silje Valde Onsrud. In the audience there were teachers from schools, artists, researchers in the arts and people adminestring the Cultural Rucksack in Western Norway, funding artistic projects for schools.

Culture, Criticism, Community well represented at RIME 2019

Members of the CCC research group were well represented at RIME 2019, a conference for research in music education hosted by Bath Spa University 23rd – 26th April 2019 in England.

Felicity Burbridge Rinde, Tine Grieg Viig, Kari Holdhus, Judy Lewis and Catharina Christophersen at the RIME conference 2019 in Bath.

Tine Grieg Viig presented her completed doctoral thesis “The Dynamics of Creative Music Making: a sociocultural perspective on learning in creative musicking practices”.

Judy Lewis presented a paper called “Networks of musical meaning: exploring multimodal musical listening and its implications for musical teaching and learning”

Felicity Burbridge Rinde presented a poster of her Ph.D. project Music in primary schools and social inclusion of immigrant pupils.

Kari Holdhus participated in a panel discussion named “Expending the space for improvisation pedagogy in music. What can we learn from a transdisciplinary approach?”

For more information about the conference, have a look at this website: https://www.bathspalive.com/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=RiME2019&BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::context_id=

Lykke Guanio-Uluru

Lykke Guanio-Uluru is Associate Professor of Literature at HVL. Her she currently teaches at the master and PhD levels at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, and supervises MA and PhD students. Research interests and competencies include: narrative theory, fantasy literature, digital games aesthetics, ecocriticism, posthumanism and climate fiction. She has published Ethics and Form in Fantasy Literature: Tolkien, Rowling and Meyer (2015) with Palgrave Macmillan and is co-editor of the anthology Ecocritical Perspectives on Children’s Texts and Cultures: Nordic Dialogues (2018) published with Palgrave Macmillan UK.

Members of our research group are giving some advice to the Norwegian Minister of Education

Kari Holdhus and Catharina Christophersen are giving advice to the minister of education in how to strengthen arts education in Norwegian Schools and Kindergartens. In one of the national newspapers, Dagsavisen, they challenge the Norwegian government and minestry of education to prioritize arts education in the same way as they do with subjects like science and maths. Read more here: https://www.dagsavisen.no/nyemeninger/du-trenger-ikke-vente-på-læreplanen-sanner-1.1290096?fbclid=IwAR2vcID-TWDUg8cn23FrNT3Xpyy7XAgA4CGzIPqtkJvT5yKlEJrUZOKssaA

Katrine Heggstad

Katrine Heggstad is a PhD candidate at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), enrolled in the PhD programme Bildung and didactical practices since April 2016 with the project: Drama, Dementia & Dignity: Questioning borderlines in drama pedagogics.

The Polyphony of Musician-Teacher Partnership: Towards Real Dialogues?

Kari Holdhus has published a new article in Thinking Skills and Creativity volum 31, 2019. The article is entitled The Polyphony of Musician–Teacher Partnerships: Towards Real Dialogues?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871187118302347

This article aims to explore and discuss how, on many levels and in many ways, polyphonic dialogues can fluctuate among participants in a multidisciplinary didactic art project im- plemented in schools, namely, School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue (DiSko). DiSko is an innovation project that aims to try different ways to address the significant lack of school ownership to professional visiting concerts in Norwegian schools.

The project method, educational design research, is a combination of approaches that are usually applied to well-known research-based problems. Empirically, researchers and partici- pants carry out successive iterations of experiential case interventions based on ongoing analysis. A central aim of the method is to suggest concrete research-based solutions or new ways of addressing a problem, which is instrumental outside specific case contexts.

Dialogue is a major epistemological grounding for DiSko and its descriptive cases, and throughout the article, the project design and activities are viewed in terms of Bakhtin’s concepts chronotope, carnival and polyphony. Through discussions about aspects of the methodology as well as by providing an empirical case example, this article describes how elements of educa- tional design research may be composed in order to maintain an epistemology of dialogue and polyphony.

When Students Teach Creativities: Exploring Student Reports on Creative Teaching

This is an article written by Kari Holdhus and published in Qualitative Inquiry in 2018.

In this article, Kari Holdhus shares a journey of research on student teacher reports regarding creativity pedagogies. The empirical material comprises student reports on teaching for creativity. The text draws on the literatures of creativities, creativity pedagogies, and professional improvisation, inspired by a backdrop of literature on narrativity and narrative writing. The text aims to discuss how creativity pedagogies can take place in different practical surroundings and to provide an example of how teaching in higher education can both contribute to research and be research-based. The following research question is asked: What characterizes student teachers’ reports on designs and choices when facilitating creative learning processes, and which interpretations and reflections do these reports evoke within their teacher? In comparing student papers, Holdhus has conceptualized their common features into the following concepts: context, skills, design, and trust. Within the text, each of these concepts is addressed through example narratives extracted from the student reports. Holdhus concludes that a combination of aspects from each of the four concepts can be said to construct a liminal room of immersion.

See the whole article here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1077800418801377