Breaking the dualism of art vs. pedagogy

Jonas presenting his work at NNMPF

As a part of the conference Nordic Network for Music Pedagogy Research in Copenhagen, March 2020, several members of the research group were involved during the symposium «Breaking the dualism of art vs. pedagogy»:

Kari Holdhus presented the overall project («School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue») and “Potensial and Challenges for Dialogue and Equity in Musician-Teacher Collaborations”. Jonas Cisar Romme presented «Success Factors and Obstacles in Dialogic Teacher-Musician Collaborations» and Catharina Christophersen commented and facilitated an open discussion. The symposium attracted interest from researchers, music educators and policy makers.

Highly relevant article about Musician-Teacher Partnerships now online

Image from IJEA website, visual abstract of the article

Research group member Ailbhe Kenny has published a new article in International Journal of Education and the Arts, The ‘Back and Forth’ of Musician-Teacher Partnership in a New York City School.

In the abstract, Kenny writes: Teaching artists are often a central feature of arts-in-education work in North American schools. This article examines a teaching artist’s engagement in one New York City school, with three classroom teachers, as part of the Philharmonic Schools program. Through a qualitative case study approach, musician-teacher partnership within one public school is problematized. Data was collected over seven months through in-class observations, classroom teacher and teaching artist interviews, and a teaching artist reflective log. Findings reveal how the classroom teachers and teaching artist journeyed together to deliver music in their classrooms, projected musician/teacher identities, negotiated roles within the partnership, created reflective spaces and mutually informed each other’s practice. Thus, the complexity of, but also the possibilities and pathways for, dialogic music-in-education partnerships are revealed.

Please go to IJEA to read more about this interesting research!

New article recommendation: Negotiating teacher-artist identities: “Disturbance” through partnership

Ailbhe Kenny, our research group member from Mary Immaculate College, University of Ireland, has recently published a new article on the topic Negotiating teacher-artist identities: “Disturbance” through partnership in collaboration with colleague Dorothy Morrisey. They write in the abstract:

This article troubles the notion of “disturbance” in relation to teacher-artist identities within partnerships delivering arts education in schools. As such, a visiting artist/teaching artist entering an educational setting “alters” the space and forces the negotiation of professional (and personal) identities. These “disturbances” can be advantageous for schools, teachers, children, young people, broader communities as well as the artists themselves in offering key learning and development opportunities. Too often however, such partnerships lack critical debate and examination. This article offers findings from an in-depth teacher-artist partnership study in order to contribute perspectives on understanding how teacher-artist identities are negotiated so as to potentially transform policy and practice approaches to arts education in schools. The Irish government-supported partnership initiative involved a residential summer course, in-school work, as well as review days with six teacher-artist pairs over 22 months. Data was collected and analyzed from across interviews, reflective diaries, in-school observations and evaluations to illuminate the partners’ learning journeys and negotiated identities within the initiative. Thematic findings reveal three overarching themes relating to (re)forming, inhabiting and projecting identity. It was found that both teacher and artist skills, knowledge and understandings can complement each other successfully where meaningful, sustained partnerships are invested in. The significant value of a dialogical and relational approach within the partnership holds interesting insights for policymakers, schools, arts agencies, teachers, and artists to inform future arts education partnership initiatives and policy approaches.

A recommended read indeed! Please go to Taylor&Francis online and download the article from Arts Education Policy Review.

Successful midway evaluation

On Wednesday 19 February many of the CCC research group attended PhD candidate Felicity Burbridge Rinde’s midway evaluation of her project on the use of music with newly arrived minority language pupils in Norwegian primary schools. The evaluation committee, Line Hilt from the University of Bergen and Eva Sæther from the University of Malmø, asked many exciting questions and gave a lot of constructive feedback. Rinde sums up:

This has been an important milepost on the horizon for a while, and it was an extremely positive experience to present my project, including glimpses from the ongoing ethnographic fieldwork, discuss methodology, and be challenged on certain points in the texts to the evaluation committee.

The afternoon was rounded off with a well-deserved dinner with research group colleagues in Bergen.

Felicity also presented some of the same material at the 20th NNMPF conference in Copenhagen in the beginning of March. Please stay tuned at the CCC blog site for updates on this groundbreaking research!

Lykke Guanio-Uluru

Lykke Guanio-Uluru is Associate Professor of Literature at HVL. Her she currently teaches at the master and PhD levels at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, and supervises MA and PhD students. Research interests and competencies include: narrative theory, fantasy literature, digital games aesthetics, ecocriticism, posthumanism and climate fiction. She has published Ethics and Form in Fantasy Literature: Tolkien, Rowling and Meyer (2015) with Palgrave Macmillan and is co-editor of the anthology Ecocritical Perspectives on Children’s Texts and Cultures: Nordic Dialogues (2018) published with Palgrave Macmillan UK.

Members of our research group are giving some advice to the Norwegian Minister of Education

Kari Holdhus and Catharina Christophersen are giving advice to the minister of education in how to strengthen arts education in Norwegian Schools and Kindergartens. In one of the national newspapers, Dagsavisen, they challenge the Norwegian government and minestry of education to prioritize arts education in the same way as they do with subjects like science and maths. Read more here: https://www.dagsavisen.no/nyemeninger/du-trenger-ikke-vente-på-læreplanen-sanner-1.1290096?fbclid=IwAR2vcID-TWDUg8cn23FrNT3Xpyy7XAgA4CGzIPqtkJvT5yKlEJrUZOKssaA

Jonas Cisar Romme

Jonas is lecturer in music education and community music and researcher at Western Norway University College of Applied Sciences, campus Stord. Since 2016 he has been central in the development of Scandinavia’s first bachelor program in Community Music.

Jonas is active as a researcher in “School and concert – from transmission to dialogue” – an innovation project on Norwegian professional visiting concerts in partnership with Kulturtanken, founded by the Norwegian Research Council (www.diskoprosjektet.no). This project runs for four years from 2017.

He holds a master’s degree in Creative Subjects and Learning Processes from 2015. The thesis is named “My Music Performance is Changing!” – Perspectives on “The Aesthetic Talk” in Ensemble Teaching in Upper Secondary School.

Teaching subjects: Arranging/Composing, popular music and jazz music history, ensemble playing, how to workshop, ear training, music theory, community music philosophy, history and central concepts, supervision of bachelor candidates.

He has a background as a music teacher in Norwegian upper secondary school (“Musikklinja”), in municipal culture schools, as music reviewer, arranger for choir and big band, and is currently conducting/leading and arranging for a local big band.

Jonas’s research interests are creativity, learning processes, inclusion, democracy and sustainability, the potential of community music praxis in Scandinavian music pedagogy, music philosophies and their relationship to quality conceptions.

Tine Grieg Viig defended her doctoral thesis

 The 7th December 2018 Tine Grieg Viig defended her doctoral thesis at the University of Bergen. The thesis is named The Dynamics of Creative Music Making: A socio-cultural perspective on learning in creative musical practices, and explores how learning is shaped and facilitated in creative musical practices. The study is designed as a multiple case-study, where interviews and video-observations have been the main source for empirical material.

The thesis consists of four articles and a synopsis. The first article is a literature-review of relevant research from the last ten years published in selected music education journals. The next three articles present results from the analysis of the study’s empirical data. The study contributes to a discussion about how to understand different forms of learning and the facilitator’s role in creative musical practices from a socio-cultural perspective. 

For more information about the doctoral defence, see https://kmd.uib.no/no/kalender/disputas-for-tine-grieg-viig

Contribution from the CCC-Group at the Norwegian Network Conference for Music Teacher Education

At the Norwegian Network Conference for Music Teacher Education 22.-23. October 2018 at North University in Bodø, 3 memebers from the CCC research group contributed to the topic Inclusive Music Education.

Judy Lewis was the keynote speaker with the talk The act of listening: What  twenty 10-year olds taught me about social justice.

Felicity Burbridge Rinde presented the paper Music in Primary School and Inclusion of Immigrant Students.

Silje Valde Onsrud was chairing and moderating different sections, in addition to introducing the main topic for the conference, and presenting a paper about heteronormativity as a challenge for musical expressions in school.