Music in primary schools and social inclusion of immigrant pupils in Norway

Felicity Burbridge Rinde

This PhD project is a critical investigation of participatory music making as an arena for inclusion and community building in primary schools with intensive language classes for newly arrived immigrant pupils, exploring dynamics of inclusion and exclusion.

Norway has recently experienced a relatively large influx of immigrants that has led to rapid changes in its formerly fairly homogeneous society and school system. The national curriculum states that music as a school subject plays a central role in adapted teaching in an inclusive school, and that in a multicultural society music education has the potential to contribute to pupils’ positive identity formation through encouraging a sense of belonging to their own cultures and cultural heritage, as well as tolerance and respect for other people’s cultures.

To collect data, an ethnographic case study of music lessons and music activities in an urban primary school with an intensive language class is carried out, including:

  • Non-participant observation
  • Interviews with pupils, teachers and head
  • Field notes and researcher reflexive log
  • Pilot project participatory music workshops

The theoretical starting points of the study are:

  • Intercultural education (Portera, 2010)
  • Socialisation into educational settings that allows ‘newcomers’ to be active subjects in their new surroundings (Biesta, 2015)
  • Potential communities of musical practice (Kenny, 2016) in schools with intensive language classes
  • Building community through musical participation (Turino, 2008)
  • Musical action as a performative, social phenomenon (Bowman, 2007)
  • Inclusion and exclusion processes for minority language students in Norwegian schools (Hilt, 2016; Jortveit, 2014)

Project period: 2017 – 2021

Moments from the open seminar arranged by Culture, Criticism, Community 20th February 2019

The open seminar Student – teacher-artist collaborations: Developing multi-professional creative partnerships in schools was arranged by the CCC research group 20th February 2019 at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, campus Bergen. Here are some moments from the seminar. You find the whole program under Events in this blog.

Ailbhe Kenny is sharing her experiences from a teacher-artist collaboration project in Ireland.
Jonas Cisar Romme and Kari Holdhus are sharing experiences from the Disko project at Stord, Norway.
Panel discussion with the audience moderated by Silje Valde Onsrud. In the audience there were teachers from schools, artists, researchers in the arts and people adminestring the Cultural Rucksack in Western Norway, funding artistic projects for schools.

Culture, Criticism, Community well represented at RIME 2019

Members of the CCC research group were well represented at RIME 2019, a conference for research in music education hosted by Bath Spa University 23rd – 26th April 2019 in England.

Felicity Burbridge Rinde, Tine Grieg Viig, Kari Holdhus, Judy Lewis and Catharina Christophersen at the RIME conference 2019 in Bath.

Tine Grieg Viig presented her completed doctoral thesis “The Dynamics of Creative Music Making: a sociocultural perspective on learning in creative musicking practices”.

Judy Lewis presented a paper called “Networks of musical meaning: exploring multimodal musical listening and its implications for musical teaching and learning”

Felicity Burbridge Rinde presented a poster of her Ph.D. project Music in primary schools and social inclusion of immigrant pupils.

Kari Holdhus participated in a panel discussion named “Expending the space for improvisation pedagogy in music. What can we learn from a transdisciplinary approach?”

For more information about the conference, have a look at this website: https://www.bathspalive.com/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=RiME2019&BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::context_id=

Lykke Guanio-Uluru

Lykke Guanio-Uluru is Associate Professor of Literature at HVL. Her she currently teaches at the master and PhD levels at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, and supervises MA and PhD students. Research interests and competencies include: narrative theory, fantasy literature, digital games aesthetics, ecocriticism, posthumanism and climate fiction. She has published Ethics and Form in Fantasy Literature: Tolkien, Rowling and Meyer (2015) with Palgrave Macmillan and is co-editor of the anthology Ecocritical Perspectives on Children’s Texts and Cultures: Nordic Dialogues (2018) published with Palgrave Macmillan UK.

Members of our research group are giving some advice to the Norwegian Minister of Education

Kari Holdhus and Catharina Christophersen are giving advice to the minister of education in how to strengthen arts education in Norwegian Schools and Kindergartens. In one of the national newspapers, Dagsavisen, they challenge the Norwegian government and minestry of education to prioritize arts education in the same way as they do with subjects like science and maths. Read more here: https://www.dagsavisen.no/nyemeninger/du-trenger-ikke-vente-på-læreplanen-sanner-1.1290096?fbclid=IwAR2vcID-TWDUg8cn23FrNT3Xpyy7XAgA4CGzIPqtkJvT5yKlEJrUZOKssaA

The Polyphony of Musician-Teacher Partnership: Towards Real Dialogues?

Kari Holdhus has published a new article in Thinking Skills and Creativity volum 31, 2019. The article is entitled The Polyphony of Musician–Teacher Partnerships: Towards Real Dialogues?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871187118302347

This article aims to explore and discuss how, on many levels and in many ways, polyphonic dialogues can fluctuate among participants in a multidisciplinary didactic art project im- plemented in schools, namely, School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue (DiSko). DiSko is an innovation project that aims to try different ways to address the significant lack of school ownership to professional visiting concerts in Norwegian schools.

The project method, educational design research, is a combination of approaches that are usually applied to well-known research-based problems. Empirically, researchers and partici- pants carry out successive iterations of experiential case interventions based on ongoing analysis. A central aim of the method is to suggest concrete research-based solutions or new ways of addressing a problem, which is instrumental outside specific case contexts.

Dialogue is a major epistemological grounding for DiSko and its descriptive cases, and throughout the article, the project design and activities are viewed in terms of Bakhtin’s concepts chronotope, carnival and polyphony. Through discussions about aspects of the methodology as well as by providing an empirical case example, this article describes how elements of educa- tional design research may be composed in order to maintain an epistemology of dialogue and polyphony.

When Students Teach Creativities: Exploring Student Reports on Creative Teaching

This is an article written by Kari Holdhus and published in Qualitative Inquiry in 2018.

In this article, Kari Holdhus shares a journey of research on student teacher reports regarding creativity pedagogies. The empirical material comprises student reports on teaching for creativity. The text draws on the literatures of creativities, creativity pedagogies, and professional improvisation, inspired by a backdrop of literature on narrativity and narrative writing. The text aims to discuss how creativity pedagogies can take place in different practical surroundings and to provide an example of how teaching in higher education can both contribute to research and be research-based. The following research question is asked: What characterizes student teachers’ reports on designs and choices when facilitating creative learning processes, and which interpretations and reflections do these reports evoke within their teacher? In comparing student papers, Holdhus has conceptualized their common features into the following concepts: context, skills, design, and trust. Within the text, each of these concepts is addressed through example narratives extracted from the student reports. Holdhus concludes that a combination of aspects from each of the four concepts can be said to construct a liminal room of immersion.

See the whole article here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1077800418801377

DiSko

DiSko is an innovation project intending to innovate school concert practices produced  and implemented nationally by Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN) and regional partners in Norway. The project will innovate an established practice through research based innovation procedures in order to respond to challenges connected to school ownership and school integration. This research-based innovation work  will be carried out over four years with a selection of schools and groups of musicians and producers from NCA within a budget of 7.4 mill NOK. The DiSko project will develop and try out alternative concert forms, which to a greater degree can be experienced and shared by pupils, teachers as well as musicians. Our research questions are:

  • How can dialogue based concert practices be produced in order to be integrated as meaningful and professional elements in school´s everyday life?
  • How can schools facilitate such integration in their work with teaching, learning and Bildung?

DiSko´s point of departure is that shared ownership emerges through equity-based relations, and our practical innovation processes will be grounded in this belief.  From the practical iterations of concert productions, researchers will develop analysis and research reports, and parallel to the concert production activities, a continuous implementation and discussion will take place. An interactive website will be a central component in the communication between researchers, musicians, teachers and users, other interested persons and organizations.

Funding:  Norwegian Research council (NFR)

Project owner: Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN)

Research partner: CASE center, at Stord/Haugesund University College

Principal investigator:Professor Magne Espeland

Jonas Cisar Romme

Jonas is lecturer in music education and community music and researcher at Western Norway University College of Applied Sciences, campus Stord. Since 2016 he has been central in the development of Scandinavia’s first bachelor program in Community Music.

Jonas is active as a researcher in “School and concert – from transmission to dialogue” – an innovation project on Norwegian professional visiting concerts in partnership with Kulturtanken, founded by the Norwegian Research Council (www.diskoprosjektet.no). This project runs for four years from 2017.

He holds a master’s degree in Creative Subjects and Learning Processes from 2015. The thesis is named “My Music Performance is Changing!” – Perspectives on “The Aesthetic Talk” in Ensemble Teaching in Upper Secondary School.

Teaching subjects: Arranging/Composing, popular music and jazz music history, ensemble playing, how to workshop, ear training, music theory, community music philosophy, history and central concepts, supervision of bachelor candidates.

He has a background as a music teacher in Norwegian upper secondary school (“Musikklinja”), in municipal culture schools, as music reviewer, arranger for choir and big band, and is currently conducting/leading and arranging for a local big band.

Jonas’s research interests are creativity, learning processes, inclusion, democracy and sustainability, the potential of community music praxis in Scandinavian music pedagogy, music philosophies and their relationship to quality conceptions.

Student – teacher-artist collaborations: Developing multi-professional creative partnerships in schools

Welcome to an open research seminar with the research group Culture – Criticism – Community in Fyrrommet at HVL campus Kronstad, February 20th 2019 at 1300-1500.

About the seminar:

Arts-in- education projects and creative partnerships are included in children’s arts education within schools.  Such collaborations between artists and schools are often encouraged by politicians, and by many viewed as excellent opportunities for inspiring artistic experiences and encounters. However, as research tells us, such collaborations could also be very challenging and problematic from the perspectives of teachers and of arts education.

The purpose of the seminar is to explore multi-professional collaborations in schools, and connect this topic to teacher education: What are the challenges and possibilities surrounding such collaborations, and how can pre-service arts teachers be prepared to participate in such collaborations?

Program

1300-1415: What does research say about the possibilities and challenges of artist-teacher collaborations in school contexts?

  • Catharina Christophersen:  Introduction
  • Ailbhe Kenny: Teacher-Artist Partnerships as a model of continual professional development in Ireland.
  • Kari Holdhus & Jonas Romme: Functioning partnerships between schools and artists in dialogical art productions (The DiSko project)
  • Ingvild Digranes:  Professional dilemmas in the Cultural Rucksack
  • Ailbhe Kenny & Catharina Christophersen: Pathways and possibilities for Collaborations in Schools

1415-1500: What could a functioning artist-teacher partnership look like, and how could pre-service teachers be prepared to participate in future partnerships?

The discussion will include researchers, teacher educators, arts teachers and preservice arts teachers. Moderator: Silje Valde Onsrud.