Highly relevant article about Musician-Teacher Partnerships now online

Image from IJEA website, visual abstract of the article

Research group member Ailbhe Kenny has published a new article in International Journal of Education and the Arts, The ‘Back and Forth’ of Musician-Teacher Partnership in a New York City School.

In the abstract, Kenny writes: Teaching artists are often a central feature of arts-in-education work in North American schools. This article examines a teaching artist’s engagement in one New York City school, with three classroom teachers, as part of the Philharmonic Schools program. Through a qualitative case study approach, musician-teacher partnership within one public school is problematized. Data was collected over seven months through in-class observations, classroom teacher and teaching artist interviews, and a teaching artist reflective log. Findings reveal how the classroom teachers and teaching artist journeyed together to deliver music in their classrooms, projected musician/teacher identities, negotiated roles within the partnership, created reflective spaces and mutually informed each other’s practice. Thus, the complexity of, but also the possibilities and pathways for, dialogic music-in-education partnerships are revealed.

Please go to IJEA to read more about this interesting research!

New article recommendation: Negotiating teacher-artist identities: “Disturbance” through partnership

Ailbhe Kenny, our research group member from Mary Immaculate College, University of Ireland, has recently published a new article on the topic Negotiating teacher-artist identities: “Disturbance” through partnership in collaboration with colleague Dorothy Morrisey. They write in the abstract:

This article troubles the notion of “disturbance” in relation to teacher-artist identities within partnerships delivering arts education in schools. As such, a visiting artist/teaching artist entering an educational setting “alters” the space and forces the negotiation of professional (and personal) identities. These “disturbances” can be advantageous for schools, teachers, children, young people, broader communities as well as the artists themselves in offering key learning and development opportunities. Too often however, such partnerships lack critical debate and examination. This article offers findings from an in-depth teacher-artist partnership study in order to contribute perspectives on understanding how teacher-artist identities are negotiated so as to potentially transform policy and practice approaches to arts education in schools. The Irish government-supported partnership initiative involved a residential summer course, in-school work, as well as review days with six teacher-artist pairs over 22 months. Data was collected and analyzed from across interviews, reflective diaries, in-school observations and evaluations to illuminate the partners’ learning journeys and negotiated identities within the initiative. Thematic findings reveal three overarching themes relating to (re)forming, inhabiting and projecting identity. It was found that both teacher and artist skills, knowledge and understandings can complement each other successfully where meaningful, sustained partnerships are invested in. The significant value of a dialogical and relational approach within the partnership holds interesting insights for policymakers, schools, arts agencies, teachers, and artists to inform future arts education partnership initiatives and policy approaches.

A recommended read indeed! Please go to Taylor&Francis online and download the article from Arts Education Policy Review.

The Polyphony of Musician-Teacher Partnership: Towards Real Dialogues?

Kari Holdhus has published a new article in Thinking Skills and Creativity volum 31, 2019. The article is entitled The Polyphony of Musician–Teacher Partnerships: Towards Real Dialogues?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871187118302347

This article aims to explore and discuss how, on many levels and in many ways, polyphonic dialogues can fluctuate among participants in a multidisciplinary didactic art project implemented in schools, namely, School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue (DiSko). DiSko is an innovation project that aims to try different ways to address the significant lack of school ownership to professional visiting concerts in Norwegian schools.

The project method, educational design research, is a combination of approaches that are usually applied to well-known research-based problems. Empirically, researchers and partici- pants carry out successive iterations of experiential case interventions based on ongoing analysis. A central aim of the method is to suggest concrete research-based solutions or new ways of addressing a problem, which is instrumental outside specific case contexts.

Dialogue is a major epistemological grounding for DiSko and its descriptive cases, and throughout the article, the project design and activities are viewed in terms of Bakhtin’s concepts chronotope, carnival and polyphony. Through discussions about aspects of the methodology as well as by providing an empirical case example, this article describes how elements of educational design research may be composed in order to maintain an epistemology of dialogue and polyphony.

When Students Teach Creativities: Exploring Student Reports on Creative Teaching

“When Students Teach Creativities: Exploring Student Reports on Creative Teaching” is an article written by Kari Holdhus and published in Qualitative Inquiry in 2018.

In this article, Kari Holdhus shares a journey of research on student teacher reports regarding creativity pedagogies. The empirical material comprises student reports on teaching for creativity. The text draws on the literatures of creativities, creativity pedagogies, and professional improvisation, inspired by a backdrop of literature on narrativity and narrative writing. The text aims to discuss how creativity pedagogies can take place in different practical surroundings and to provide an example of how teaching in higher education can both contribute to research and be research-based. The following research question is asked: What characterizes student teachers’ reports on designs and choices when facilitating creative learning processes, and which interpretations and reflections do these reports evoke within their teacher? In comparing student papers, Holdhus has conceptualized their common features into the following concepts: context, skills, design, and trust. Within the text, each of these concepts is addressed through example narratives extracted from the student reports. Holdhus concludes that a combination of aspects from each of the four concepts can be said to construct a liminal room of immersion.

See the whole article here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1077800418801377

Playing to learn or learning to play? New article in British Journal of Music Education

The article “Playing to learn or learning to play? Playing Rocksmith to learn electric guitar and bass in Nordic music teacher education” was published 16th November 2018 by Sigrid Jordal Havre , Lauri Väkevä Catharina R. Christophersen  and Egil Haugland in British Journal of Music Education. 

This article is based on a case study of how the Rocksmith entertainment music video game can be used in the context of studying electric guitar and bass as part of music teacher training. In empirical terms, we were interested in how music teachers’ knowledge becomes articulated in the pedagogical discourse of our participants. As conceptual points of departure, we used play theory, game studies, and the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) model of teacher’s knowledge. Four ways of approaching the potential role of Rocksmith in music teacher education stand out as a result. In the discussion, we suggest that music gaming can be conceptualised as an activity that expands the reach of what can be considered as ‘playful’ and ‘serious’ in music teacher studies. Such an approach can guide our thinking about how different areas of music teachers’ knowledge merge into multidimensional competence, paving the way for further discussion about how ‘music educatorship’ can be constructed in the digital era.

See more about the article here:   https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-music-education/article/playing-to-learn-or-learning-to-play-playing-rocksmith-to-learn-electric-guitar-and-bass-in-nordic-music-teacher-education/0119E77C73FA85167F9185ABD7EFFB43