Artistic work: Constanza Bergen Jazz Project

Members of Culture, Criticism and Community participate in various artistic constellations in and outside of work. Such involvement may serve as platforms for future artistic research efforts. Until such artistic research projects become a reality, we will introduce here some of the general artistic activities we participate in.

A first example is the jazz band called Constanza Bergen Jazz Project, where our research group member Øystein Kvinge plays the piano. The band and its repertoare is centred around the talented and emerging singer Constanza Giacomelli from Malaga, Spain. The repertoire is a mix of well known standard tunes from the American songbook, and an exquisite selection of French standard material. Both the American and French material is treated as jazz standards, which allow for spontaniety and innovation during performance.

The band has appeared at jazz clubs in Bergen and in the surrounding region. Coming up is a performance at Mæland Jazz Club on April 25th, 2019.

Current line up:
Constanza Giacomelli – vocals
Peter Sæverud – bass
Jan Tore Ness- drums
Bjørn Blomberg – sax
Øystein Kvinge – piano

Tonight's performance was a joy for us! What a crowd, what a setting, what an atmosphere… What a Difference a Day Makes.Thank you, Old Times Jazzvenners Klubb, for hosting such an unforgettable event.

Publisert av Constanza Bergen Jazz Project Tirsdag 2. oktober 2018

The band performs What a difference a day makes
(Grever/Adams) at Dyveke’s Wine Cellar, October 2018

DiSko

DiSko is an innovation project intending to innovate school concert practices produced  and implemented nationally by Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN) and regional partners in Norway. The project will innovate an established practice through research based innovation procedures in order to respond to challenges connected to school ownership and school integration. This research-based innovation work  will be carried out over four years with a selection of schools and groups of musicians and producers from NCA within a budget of 7.4 mill NOK. The DiSko project will develop and try out alternative concert forms, which to a greater degree can be experienced and shared by pupils, teachers as well as musicians. Our research questions are:

  • How can dialogue based concert practices be produced in order to be integrated as meaningful and professional elements in school´s everyday life?
  • How can schools facilitate such integration in their work with teaching, learning and Bildung?

DiSko´s point of departure is that shared ownership emerges through equity-based relations, and our practical innovation processes will be grounded in this belief.  From the practical iterations of concert productions, researchers will develop analysis and research reports, and parallel to the concert production activities, a continuous implementation and discussion will take place. An interactive website will be a central component in the communication between researchers, musicians, teachers and users, other interested persons and organizations.

Funding:  Norwegian Research council (NFR)

Project owner: Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN)

Research partner: CASE center, at Stord/Haugesund University College

Principal investigator:Professor Magne Espeland

Jonas Cisar Romme

Jonas is lecturer in music education and community music and researcher at Western Norway University College of Applied Sciences, campus Stord. Since 2016 he has been central in the development of Scandinavia’s first bachelor program in Community Music.

Jonas is active as a researcher in “School and concert – from transmission to dialogue” – an innovation project on Norwegian professional visiting concerts in partnership with Kulturtanken, founded by the Norwegian Research Council (www.diskoprosjektet.no). This project runs for four years from 2017.

He holds a master’s degree in Creative Subjects and Learning Processes from 2015. The thesis is named “My Music Performance is Changing!” – Perspectives on “The Aesthetic Talk” in Ensemble Teaching in Upper Secondary School.

Teaching subjects: Arranging/Composing, popular music and jazz music history, ensemble playing, how to workshop, ear training, music theory, community music philosophy, history and central concepts, supervision of bachelor candidates.

He has a background as a music teacher in Norwegian upper secondary school (“Musikklinja”), in municipal culture schools, as music reviewer, arranger for choir and big band, and is currently conducting/leading and arranging for a local big band.

Jonas’s research interests are creativity, learning processes, inclusion, democracy and sustainability, the potential of community music praxis in Scandinavian music pedagogy, music philosophies and their relationship to quality conceptions.

Student – teacher-artist collaborations: Developing multi-professional creative partnerships in schools

Welcome to an open research seminar with the research group Culture – Criticism – Community in Fyrrommet at HVL campus Kronstad, February 20th 2019 at 1300-1500.

About the seminar:

Arts-in- education projects and creative partnerships are included in children’s arts education within schools.  Such collaborations between artists and schools are often encouraged by politicians, and by many viewed as excellent opportunities for inspiring artistic experiences and encounters. However, as research tells us, such collaborations could also be very challenging and problematic from the perspectives of teachers and of arts education.

The purpose of the seminar is to explore multi-professional collaborations in schools, and connect this topic to teacher education: What are the challenges and possibilities surrounding such collaborations, and how can pre-service arts teachers be prepared to participate in such collaborations?

Program

1300-1415: What does research say about the possibilities and challenges of artist-teacher collaborations in school contexts?

  • Catharina Christophersen:  Introduction
  • Ailbhe Kenny: Teacher-Artist Partnerships as a model of continual professional development in Ireland.
  • Kari Holdhus & Jonas Romme: Functioning partnerships between schools and artists in dialogical art productions (The DiSko project)
  • Ingvild Digranes:  Professional dilemmas in the Cultural Rucksack
  • Ailbhe Kenny & Catharina Christophersen: Pathways and possibilities for Collaborations in Schools

1415-1500: What could a functioning artist-teacher partnership look like, and how could pre-service teachers be prepared to participate in future partnerships?

The discussion will include researchers, teacher educators, arts teachers and preservice arts teachers. Moderator: Silje Valde Onsrud.

Funding of new research project

Project manager Catharina Christophersen

Members of the Culture, Criticism, Community-research group have received funding from the Norwegian Research Council to start up the project Music Teacher Education for the Future (FUTURED) autumn 2019 till autumn 2022. Catharina Christophersen (picture) is the manager of the whole project, while Silje Valde Onsrud, Kari Holdhus, Judy Lewis and Ailbhe Kenny participate in the different work packages. Collaborating partners are Viv Ellis from HVL/King’s College London, Jan Sverre Knudsen, Hanne Fossum and Bendik Fredriksen from OsloMet, Jon Helge Sætre from the Norwegian Music Academy, Heidi Partti from University of the
Arts Helsinki. Here you can read more about the project: https://www.hvl.no/nyhende/12-mill-til-futured–forsking-pa-musikklararutdanning/

Ingvild Digranes

Ingvild Digranes is Associate professor of Art and design education, and holds a PhD from the Oslo School of Architecture and Design within education. She teaches and supervises in the Art and design education program at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, campus Bergen. She holds a degree as generalist teacher education with Art and design. She has taught Art and design in general education before entering into the PhD-programme, higher education, and research. Her interest lies in Art and design in schools and teacher training, artist teacher collaborations in schools, and design literacy.

“Music Teacher Education for the Future”

The project “Music Teacher Education for the Future” will critically explore general teacher education (GTE) music programs in Norway. The basic assumptions underlying the project is that music teacher education must relate to societal needs and challenges, and that educational approaches must cater for versatile musicianship, learning styles, and critical reflection. The project aims to challenge status quo, as well as to develop innovative and collaborative practices that can foster pre-service music teachers’ critical and democratic capacities, as well as future music teacher agency. The project is organized into three work packages (WPs): 

(1) Mapping the current situation within music teacher education;

(2) Developing spaces for critical reflexivity and agency within the education;

(3) Developing collaborative, innovative and interactive music education practices within schools

The research design will draw upon action research, and theoretical perspectives combine insights from critical (music)pedagogy, educational philosophy, cultural studies, and public pedagogy. The results will be combined into a comprehensive overview of music teacher education. Other research outcomes will be curriculum development, new assessment methods and exploratory teaching approaches. Outcomes will be communicated to academic and non-academic audiences.

The project group includes the following researchers from Western Norway University of Applied Sciences: Professor Catharina Christophersen (project leader), professor Viv Ellis, associate professor Silje Valde Onsrud, professor Kari Holdhus, Postdoc candidate Tine Grieg Viig and Ph.D. candidate Eyolf Nysæther. Three researchers from Oslo Metropolitan University (Jan Sverre Knudsen, Hanne Rinholm and Bendik Fredriksen), as well as guest researchers (Ailbhe Kenny, Judy Lewis, Jon Helge Sætre and Heidi Partti) are also involved.

 

 

 

Playing to learn or learning to play? New article in British Journal of Music Education

The article “Playing to learn or learning to play? Playing Rocksmith to learn electric guitar and bass in Nordic music teacher education” was published 16th November 2018 by Sigrid Jordal Havre , Lauri Väkevä Catharina R. Christophersen  and Egil Haugland in British Journal of Music Education. 

See more about the article here:   https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-music-education/article/playing-to-learn-or-learning-to-play-playing-rocksmith-to-learn-electric-guitar-and-bass-in-nordic-music-teacher-education/0119E77C73FA85167F9185ABD7EFFB43

Tine Grieg Viig defended her doctoral thesis

 The 7th December 2018 Tine Grieg Viig defended her doctoral thesis at the University of Bergen. The thesis is named The Dynamics of Creative Music Making: A socio-cultural perspective on learning in creative musical practices, and explores how learning is shaped and facilitated in creative musical practices. The study is designed as a multiple case-study, where interviews and video-observations have been the main source for empirical material.

The thesis consists of four articles and a synopsis. The first article is a literature-review of relevant research from the last ten years published in selected music education journals. The next three articles present results from the analysis of the study’s empirical data. The study contributes to a discussion about how to understand different forms of learning and the facilitator’s role in creative musical practices from a socio-cultural perspective. 

For more information about the doctoral defence, see https://kmd.uib.no/no/kalender/disputas-for-tine-grieg-viig