Breaking the dualism of art vs. pedagogy

Jonas presenting his work at NNMPF

As a part of the conference Nordic Network for Music Pedagogy Research in Copenhagen, March 2020, several members of the research group were involved during the symposium «Breaking the dualism of art vs. pedagogy»:

Kari Holdhus presented the overall project («School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue») and “Potensial and Challenges for Dialogue and Equity in Musician-Teacher Collaborations”. Jonas Cisar Romme presented «Success Factors and Obstacles in Dialogic Teacher-Musician Collaborations» and Catharina Christophersen commented and facilitated an open discussion. The symposium attracted interest from researchers, music educators and policy makers.

The Polyphony of Musician-Teacher Partnership: Towards Real Dialogues?

Kari Holdhus has published a new article in Thinking Skills and Creativity volum 31, 2019. The article is entitled The Polyphony of Musician–Teacher Partnerships: Towards Real Dialogues?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871187118302347

This article aims to explore and discuss how, on many levels and in many ways, polyphonic dialogues can fluctuate among participants in a multidisciplinary didactic art project implemented in schools, namely, School and Concert – From Transmission to Dialogue (DiSko). DiSko is an innovation project that aims to try different ways to address the significant lack of school ownership to professional visiting concerts in Norwegian schools.

The project method, educational design research, is a combination of approaches that are usually applied to well-known research-based problems. Empirically, researchers and partici- pants carry out successive iterations of experiential case interventions based on ongoing analysis. A central aim of the method is to suggest concrete research-based solutions or new ways of addressing a problem, which is instrumental outside specific case contexts.

Dialogue is a major epistemological grounding for DiSko and its descriptive cases, and throughout the article, the project design and activities are viewed in terms of Bakhtin’s concepts chronotope, carnival and polyphony. Through discussions about aspects of the methodology as well as by providing an empirical case example, this article describes how elements of educational design research may be composed in order to maintain an epistemology of dialogue and polyphony.

DiSko

DiSko is an innovation project intending to innovate school concert practices produced  and implemented nationally by Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN) and regional partners in Norway. The project will innovate an established practice through research based innovation procedures in order to respond to challenges connected to school ownership and school integration. This research-based innovation work  will be carried out over four years with a selection of schools and groups of musicians and producers from NCA within a budget of 7.4 mill NOK. The DiSko project will develop and try out alternative concert forms, which to a greater degree can be experienced and shared by pupils, teachers as well as musicians. Our research questions are:

  • How can dialogue based concert practices be produced in order to be integrated as meaningful and professional elements in school´s everyday life?
  • How can schools facilitate such integration in their work with teaching, learning and Bildung?

DiSko´s point of departure is that shared ownership emerges through equity-based relations, and our practical innovation processes will be grounded in this belief.  From the practical iterations of concert productions, researchers will develop analysis and research reports, and parallel to the concert production activities, a continuous implementation and discussion will take place. An interactive website will be a central component in the communication between researchers, musicians, teachers and users, other interested persons and organizations.

Funding:  Norwegian Research council (NFR)

Project owner: Arts for Young Audiences Norway (AYAN)

Research partner: CASE center, at Stord/Haugesund University College

Principal investigator:Professor Magne Espeland

Jonas Cisar Romme

Jonas is lecturer in music education and community music and researcher at Western Norway University College of Applied Sciences, campus Stord. Since 2016 he has been central in the development of Scandinavia’s first bachelor program in Community Music.

Jonas is active as a researcher in “School and concert – from transmission to dialogue” – an innovation project on Norwegian professional visiting concerts in partnership with Kulturtanken, founded by the Norwegian Research Council (www.diskoprosjektet.no). This project runs for four years from 2017.

He holds a master’s degree in Creative Subjects and Learning Processes from 2015. The thesis is named “My Music Performance is Changing!” – Perspectives on “The Aesthetic Talk” in Ensemble Teaching in Upper Secondary School.

Teaching subjects: Arranging/Composing, popular music and jazz music history, ensemble playing, how to workshop, ear training, music theory, community music philosophy, history and central concepts, supervision of bachelor candidates.

He has a background as a music teacher in Norwegian upper secondary school (“Musikklinja”), in municipal culture schools, as music reviewer, arranger for choir and big band, and is currently conducting/leading and arranging for a local big band.

Jonas’s research interests are creativity, learning processes, inclusion, democracy and sustainability, the potential of community music praxis in Scandinavian music pedagogy, music philosophies and their relationship to quality conceptions.

Kari Holdhus

Associate Professor
Kari Holdhus
Music education

Kari holds a Ph.D. in music education from 2014, with the monograph ”Star Experiences or Gymhall Aesthetics? – A study of visiting concerts in schools”.

She is currently project-leader of an innovation project on Norwegian professional visiting concerts, “School and concert – from transmission to dialogue”(DiSko), which is founded by the Norwegian Research Council. This project runs for four years from 2017.

Kari’s research interests are centered around communication processes between musicians and teachers in visiting music practices and musical partnerships, and she also researches the connections between quality conceptions and relativism in music education, especially addressing higher music education and community music education.

She is a contributor to the IMTE – research project (improvisation in teacher education) in writings and research activities. Kari is appointed Norwegian national coordinator in European Association for Music in Schools (easmusic.org) for the years 2018 and 2019. Kari was the leader of a MA in creative learning processes from 2013-2016, and she currently teaches and supervises within this program.

Selected publications:

Holdhus, K. (2018). Teacher–Musician Collaborations on the Move: From Performance Appreciation to Dialogue. In Altering the Chord. Possibilities and Pathways for Musician-Teacher Collaborations, edited by Ailbhe Kenny and Catharina Christophersen. London: Routledge.

Holdhus, K., Espeland, M. (2017). Music in future Nordic schooling. The Potential of the Relational Turn.European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education. Vol. 2, 02. http://www.ejpae.com/index.php/EJPAE/issue/view/3

 

Synnøve Kvile

Synnøve Kvile is a Ph.D. candidate in music education at HVL and her research investigate children’s relations to music in their everyday life, both in and outside school. The research will also focus on pupils’ musical agency in ordinary music lessons in primary school.

Synnøve Kvile has been Assistant Professor at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), campus Stord, since 2012. Besides teaching music education, piano, research theory and academic writing, she has also been involved in two research projects: Improvisation in Teacher Education (IMTE) and School and concert – from transmission to dialogue (DiSko). Together with Ingrid Grønsdal she was co-leader of the international development project Connecting Diversities in Music Education (CoDiME) and from 2013-15 she was head of the music department at Stord.