Culture, Criticism, Community well represented at RIME 2019

Members of the CCC research group were well represented at RIME 2019, a conference for research in music education hosted by Bath Spa University 23rd – 26th April 2019 in England.

Tine Grieg Viig presented her completed doctoral thesis “The Dynamics of Creative Music Making: a sociocultural perspective on learning in creative musicking practices”.

Judy Lewis presented a paper called “Networks of musical meaning: exploring multimodal musical listening and its implications for musical teaching and learning”

Felicity Burbridge Rinde presented a poster of her Ph.D. project Music in primary schools and social inclusion of immigrant pupils.

Kari Holdhus participated in a panel discussion named “Expending the space for improvisation pedagogy in music. What can we learn from a transdisciplinary approach?”

Photo: Felicity Burbridge Rinde, Tine Grieg Viig, Kari Holdhus, Judy Lewis and Catharina Christophersen at the RIME conference 2019 in Bath.

For more information about the conference, have a look at this website: https://www.bathspalive.com/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=RiME2019&BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::context_id=

Playing to learn or learning to play? New article in British Journal of Music Education

The article “Playing to learn or learning to play? Playing Rocksmith to learn electric guitar and bass in Nordic music teacher education” was published 16th November 2018 by Sigrid Jordal Havre , Lauri Väkevä Catharina R. Christophersen  and Egil Haugland in British Journal of Music Education. 

This article is based on a case study of how the Rocksmith entertainment music video game can be used in the context of studying electric guitar and bass as part of music teacher training. In empirical terms, we were interested in how music teachers’ knowledge becomes articulated in the pedagogical discourse of our participants. As conceptual points of departure, we used play theory, game studies, and the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) model of teacher’s knowledge. Four ways of approaching the potential role of Rocksmith in music teacher education stand out as a result. In the discussion, we suggest that music gaming can be conceptualised as an activity that expands the reach of what can be considered as ‘playful’ and ‘serious’ in music teacher studies. Such an approach can guide our thinking about how different areas of music teachers’ knowledge merge into multidimensional competence, paving the way for further discussion about how ‘music educatorship’ can be constructed in the digital era.

See more about the article here:   https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-music-education/article/playing-to-learn-or-learning-to-play-playing-rocksmith-to-learn-electric-guitar-and-bass-in-nordic-music-teacher-education/0119E77C73FA85167F9185ABD7EFFB43